Seattle U – Gets a Redo!

February 25th, 2010

Mesher Shing Assoc. and Kennedy Architects asked Charles Loomis to design new fixtures for Seattle University’s Campion Ballroom. The Ballroom was used for a variety of functions – and needed updating to increase its revenue potential. The fixtures wanted to make the room look like a ballroom but they also needed to be sturdily built, energy efficient, dimmable, and close to the ceiling for presentations and for more rowdy student events – involving sticks.

  • Because there were many people with opinions involved, we needed to design a concept and submit presentation drawings for approval. Once the concept was approved, we arranged for key decision makers to view a mockup of the proposed fixture. Originally, the designers wanted the Pendant’s diffusers to be clear fritted glass with blown glass bubbles cascading through the center. Then, it was decided the center glass should be ribbed cones. The preliminary mockup illustrated above incorporated this change. Further fixture changes and refinements were made as the interior finish details became more defined.

  • Here are before and after pictures of the space. Before, It was drab and outdated and didn’t look much like a ballroom. Now, it is colorful, warm, and functions as a ballroom as well as an attractive space for less formal events. Mike Harnden, with Rafn Company – the General Contractor on the project, had tight deadlines to meet to install new coves in the ceiling for the chandeleirs as well as update air systems. He did a great job! Dan Salinas, of Nelson Electric worked with us on every detail of the fixture design to ensure his crew could install them all in three days. They did it! Everyone worked together to meet design goals, budgets, and deadlines. We gave Seattle University a great finished product that addressed and exceeded their needs.

    One last note — the dangley glass in the middle of the pendant changed yet again due to fears the people with sticks might break them. They are now made of tempered glass. The stick people can whack at them to their hearts content – and they won’t break

  • Size Matters

    February 4th, 2010

    If you’re buying a Pendant or Chandelier to hang over a Dining Room table how big should it be? An easy guideline is to measure the width of your table and subtract 24”. If your table is 42″ wide, the Pendant or Chandelier should be 18″ wide. How simple is that?
    Okay, so how do you determine the size of a Pendant or Chandelier in other rooms? Piece of Cake! Measure the room from corner to corner diagonally across the room. This dimension in feet should equal the fixture diameter or width in inches. Round inches up or down to the nearest foot. For instance, if the room measures 40′ 7 ½” diagonally then you should buy a 41″ diameter fixture.
    Of course, there are exceptions to every rule. Your own sense of style plays an important part in selecting lighting that suits your space too.
    Please don’t hang your Pendant or Chandelier too low or too high! Look at the fixture while you are standing and sitting before it is permanently installed, so you can be certain it won’t obstruct views and that you aren’t going to bump your head on it. If your fixture is installed too high off the floor – it won’t feel right, it won’t provide adequate illumination, and will bother you constantly until it’s fixed.
    The light fixture in the room pictured below makes me a bit uncomfortable – do you feel it too? It’s a gorgeous glass fixture, (our Bijoux Pendant) but it appears to be too small for the room and isn’t hung in the right spot. It is installed in our Boston Showroom so it’s also an exception to the rule. Sometimes you just have to work with what you’ve got.

    See Food – Miss Head

    February 2nd, 2010

    How far off the floor should you hang a chandelier or a pendant? The answer depends on where you plan to use it.
    Above a dining table, your fixture should suspend 32” from the bottom of the fixture to the top of the table (this is based on an 8’ ceiling). Add 3” for each additional foot of ceiling height. With a 9’ ceiling, the pendant or chandelier should hang 35” above the table. If you choose an appropriate lighting fixture for the task, this allow for good lighting on the table, and people won’t bump their heads on it. Install a dimmer to dim your light fixture for romantic dinners or unattractive meals.
    When installing a foyer fixture, the bottom of the fixture should be at least 84″ above the floor. This will ensure your fixture isn’t destroyed when the door is opened, and tall people won’t bump their heads on it. If the foyer has a two story entry, place the fixture in the space so that if windows are present, it will be centered in the window when seen from outside.

    "Everyday Pieces With Edge"

    January 21st, 2010

    Our Stix Pendant is an Editor’s Pick featured in D Home Magazine in Dallas, TX! It looks nice with the furniture don’t you think? Here’s a link…… http://www.dmagazine.com/Home/D_Home/2010/January_February/Everyday_Pieces_With_Edge.aspx
    Published 1.12.2010 From D Home JAN-FEB 2010

    Talented Designer = Great Hotel

    January 20th, 2010

    Susan Marinello,of Susan Marinello Interiors,created the interior designs for a major addition to the Bellevue Hyatt Regency Hotel. The lights shown are her designs. They are energy efficient and feature natural organic elements and simple shapes. They create a fresh upscale look that appeals to a broad range of people. She selected us to manufacture the Lighting for the new Ballrooms and Public Spaces. We were fortunate to work with Susan Marinello and her group of talented designers.

    Beautiful Glass Bouquet to Illuminate your Home

    December 31st, 2009

    Here are candid factory photos of a Bouquet Pendant we recently completed for a Customer. It is one of my favorite fixtures so I thought I would share some different views of it with you. This Bouquet Pendant is 32″ Diameter. Sizes range from 10″ to 36″ Diameter. BOUQUET IN SHOPBOUQUET IN SHOP #3

    A Lighting Wonderland

    December 3rd, 2009

    Here is a photo of our Stix Pendant taken from below. The camera captured the reflections of the glass Stix in the Polished metal. Pretty spectacular – don’t you think?
    STIX W CHRIS
    Thought you might like to see the finished installation for the 1918 project in Seattle, Washington. We created (3) 76″ Diameter and (2) 52″ diameter Stix Pendants for the Atrium entry to this gorgeous new office tower. The fixtures are lamped with energy efficent LEDs that provide sparkle and sustainability. 1918 FROM 3RD FLOOR

    Atlanta Holiday House 2009

    December 1st, 2009

    Charles Loomis, Inc. donated a 36″ Dahlia Pendant to the Atlanta Holiday House to benefit the Save a Smile Foundation. The Foundation helps children with cleft lips and cranial defects to lead normal lives and restores their wonderful smiles. The Atlanta Holiday House is an amazing 22,000 square foot French Chateau built by Steve West. Here are preliminary photos. ATLANTA HOLIDAY HOUSE #3ATLANTA HOLIDAY HOUSEATLANTA HOLIDAY HOUSE #2

    Stix Installation in 1918 Office Tower

    November 20th, 2009

    Here are recent installation photos of our Stix Pendants in the upscale 1918 Building in Seattle, Washington. The fixtures are not completed, but you can get an idea of how they will look. Viewed from 3 floors in the atrium, they create a spectacular impact in the entrance to this beautiful building.
    1918 stix install 0021918 stix install 006

    Maya Romanoff

    November 13th, 2009

    PARIS FLOOR LAMP ON MAYA ROMANOFF POSTCARD Maya Romanoff, a world-renowned company that creates fabulous wallcoverings featured our Paris Floor Lamp on publicity materials for their new Beadazzled Leaf Rain Glass Bead Wallcoverings introduced at Neocon 2009. The two products compliment each other beautifully!


    news-events-photo2

    Janet McCann, of McCann Associates, Inc. in Chicago recently selected our Paris Sconces for the Dream Home in the Design Center at the Chicago Merchandise Mart. She created a state-of-the-art home office that combines high-tech with high touch.